How you can help END for-profit breeding in Arizona.

For the other underlying reasons, go to Seven reasons for animal homelessness in America

Description of the problem

Part One: We procure our pets from for-profit organizations while millions of animals are in shelters.

Per the ASPCA: According to the APPA, these are the most common sources from which primary methods cats and dogs are obtained as pets (Note: this information was based on a multiple response question, which results in the total % exceeding 100% individually for cats and dogs.  In addition, the ‘other’ category includes all source categories that were reported by <10% of both dog and cat owners):

 DogsCats
Animal Shelter/Humane Society23%31%
Friends/Relatives20%28%
Breeder34%3%
Stray6%27%
Private Party12%6%
Other32%39%
Table from APPA.


APPA reports that 34% of dogs are purchased from breeders, while 23% of dogs and 31% of cats are obtained from an animal shelter or humane society.

Around 27% of cats are acquired as strays, down from 35% in 2012. (Source: APPA)

If we want to reduce the number of pets in shelters, it makes no sense at all to breed dogs for sale (with the exception of job-specific dog-breeds, e.g. for police work will always be needed)

Part Two: Ethical and Responsible Dog Breeding does not exist.

Per PETA, there is no such thing as a “responsible” breeder, because for every puppy or kitten who is produced by any breeder, an animal awaiting adoption at an animal shelter loses his or her chance at finding a home—and will be euthanized. Breeders kill shelter animals’ chance to have a life.

Part Three: Puppy Mills are profiting at the expense of animal safety.

According to PAWS, Puppy mills are commercial breeding facilities that mass-produce dogs (and cats in cat mills) for sale through pet stores, or directly to consumers through classified ads or the Internet. Roughly 90 percent of puppies in pet stores come from puppy mills. Many retailers who buy animals from such facilities take the wholesaler’s word that the animals are happy and healthy without seeing for themselves.

In most states, these commercial breeding kennels can legally keep hundreds of dogs in cages their entire lives, for the sole purpose of continuously churning out puppies. The animals produced range from purebreds to any number of the latest “designer” mixed breeds. Cat breeding occurs under similar conditions to supply pet stores with kittens.

What can we do to stop for-profit breeding ?

Individual Actions

Let’s start with yourself. Do not buy a dog from an animal store, from a backyard breeder, a professional breeder or a puppy mill. It’s that simple. There are many shelters in Arizona, see a full list here. Our own charity partner, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue is a good place to start. Another useful research is Bailing Out Benji’s map of for-profit breeders and their Facebook group

Support Organizations that are specifically focused on this issue.

There are organizations that are focused specifically on stopping puppy mills or backyard breeding.

The Puppy Mill Project: They educate, facilitate rescue, and advocate for change. Their goal is simple: end puppy mills.

Bailing Out Benji: Bailing Out Benji, which was founded in 2011, is known for being a small nonprofit organization that makes huge waves on a small budget.

National Mill Dog Rescue: To rescue, rehabilitate and re-home discarded breeding dogs and to educate the general public about the cruel realities of the commercial dog breeding industry.

On Arizona State level:

The Arizona State law A. R. S. 44-1799 – 1799.11 comprises the state’s pet shop laws. The section requires that retail pet sellers provide purchasers a notice of rights that includes a statement of good health signed by a veterinarian. Purchasers have fifteen days to return unhealthy or diseased dogs and receive a refund or compensation for reasonable veterinary expenses. Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10. See the full section 44 – the pet store regulations start at 1799.1 to 1799.11

On County Level

Due to language in state law: Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10

On City Level

Due to language in state law: Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10

Latest News on for profit breeding in Arizona.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/consumers/2020/09/23/animal-kingdom-puppies-n-love-pet-store-accused-selling-puppy-mill-dogs/4969341002/

https://www.12news.com/article/news/local/valley/house-bill-on-puppy-mills/75-da894df3-5785-47d8-be6d-24bd7c89a911

Where to learn more:

There are many larger organizations that have excellent education resources on this topic.

American Pet Products Association

The National Council on Pet Population Study & Policy (NCPPSP)

The American Veterinary Medical Association

PAWS

Bailing out Benji

Arizona State Legislature Webpage

On Twitter:

https://twitter.com/DrAmishShah?s=20

https://twitter.com/PuppyMillFreeAZ?s=20

https://twitter.com/azhumane?s=20

https://twitter.com/HSLegFund?s=20

https://twitter.com/bailingoutbenji?s=20

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