How you can help END for-profit breeding in Arizona.

For the other underlying reasons, go to Seven reasons for animal homelessness in America

Description of the problem

Part One: We procure our pets from for-profit organizations while millions of animals are in shelters.

Per the ASPCA: According to the APPA, these are the most common sources from which primary methods cats and dogs are obtained as pets (Note: this information was based on a multiple response question, which results in the total % exceeding 100% individually for cats and dogs.  In addition, the ‘other’ category includes all source categories that were reported by <10% of both dog and cat owners):

 DogsCats
Animal Shelter/Humane Society23%31%
Friends/Relatives20%28%
Breeder34%3%
Stray6%27%
Private Party12%6%
Other32%39%
Table from APPA.


APPA reports that 34% of dogs are purchased from breeders, while 23% of dogs and 31% of cats are obtained from an animal shelter or humane society.

Around 27% of cats are acquired as strays, down from 35% in 2012. (Source: APPA)

If we want to reduce the number of pets in shelters, it makes no sense at all to breed dogs for sale (with the exception of job-specific dog-breeds, e.g. for police work will always be needed)

Part Two: Ethical and Responsible Dog Breeding does not exist.

Per PETA, there is no such thing as a “responsible” breeder, because for every puppy or kitten who is produced by any breeder, an animal awaiting adoption at an animal shelter loses his or her chance at finding a home—and will be euthanized. Breeders kill shelter animals’ chance to have a life.

Part Three: Puppy Mills are profiting at the expense of animal safety.

According to PAWS, Puppy mills are commercial breeding facilities that mass-produce dogs (and cats in cat mills) for sale through pet stores, or directly to consumers through classified ads or the Internet. Roughly 90 percent of puppies in pet stores come from puppy mills. Many retailers who buy animals from such facilities take the wholesaler’s word that the animals are happy and healthy without seeing for themselves.

In most states, these commercial breeding kennels can legally keep hundreds of dogs in cages their entire lives, for the sole purpose of continuously churning out puppies. The animals produced range from purebreds to any number of the latest “designer” mixed breeds. Cat breeding occurs under similar conditions to supply pet stores with kittens.

What can we do to stop for-profit breeding ?

Individual Actions

Let’s start with yourself. Do not buy a dog from an animal store, from a backyard breeder, a professional breeder or a puppy mill. It’s that simple. There are many shelters in Arizona, see a full list here. Our own charity partner, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue is a good place to start. Another useful research is Bailing Out Benji’s map of for-profit breeders and their Facebook group

Support Organizations that are specifically focused on this issue.

There are organizations that are focused specifically on stopping puppy mills or backyard breeding.

The Puppy Mill Project: They educate, facilitate rescue, and advocate for change. Their goal is simple: end puppy mills.

Bailing Out Benji: Bailing Out Benji, which was founded in 2011, is known for being a small nonprofit organization that makes huge waves on a small budget.

National Mill Dog Rescue: To rescue, rehabilitate and re-home discarded breeding dogs and to educate the general public about the cruel realities of the commercial dog breeding industry.

On Arizona State level:

The Arizona State law A. R. S. 44-1799 – 1799.11 comprises the state’s pet shop laws. The section requires that retail pet sellers provide purchasers a notice of rights that includes a statement of good health signed by a veterinarian. Purchasers have fifteen days to return unhealthy or diseased dogs and receive a refund or compensation for reasonable veterinary expenses. Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10. See the full section 44 – the pet store regulations start at 1799.1 to 1799.11

On County Level

Due to language in state law: Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10

On City Level

Due to language in state law: Any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance may not directly or indirectly prohibit or be applied to prohibit the sale of dogs or cats by a pet store or pet dealer, expressly or in effect, based on the source from which the animal is obtained if obtained in compliance with § 44-1799.10

Latest News on for profit breeding in Arizona.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/consumers/2020/09/23/animal-kingdom-puppies-n-love-pet-store-accused-selling-puppy-mill-dogs/4969341002/

https://www.12news.com/article/news/local/valley/house-bill-on-puppy-mills/75-da894df3-5785-47d8-be6d-24bd7c89a911

Where to learn more:

There are many larger organizations that have excellent education resources on this topic.

American Pet Products Association

The National Council on Pet Population Study & Policy (NCPPSP)

The American Veterinary Medical Association

PAWS

Bailing out Benji

Arizona State Legislature Webpage

On Twitter:

https://twitter.com/DrAmishShah?s=20

https://twitter.com/PuppyMillFreeAZ?s=20

https://twitter.com/azhumane?s=20

https://twitter.com/HSLegFund?s=20

https://twitter.com/bailingoutbenji?s=20

10 gorgeous pet pictures you cannot create with a phone camera.

You may wonder how to take the best photos of your dog or cat. This article explains why taking pictures with your phone camera is not a replacement for professional pet photography.

Marcel van der Stroom
Marcel van der Stroom

Founder and CEO of Progress Through Photography. Certified Professional Photographer (CPP) and graduate student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism / ASU.

Why cellphone cameras are not the answer for all photographic challenges

There is some common wisdom in the fact that “the best camera is the one that you have with you”. While it is certainly true that you can’t take photos with a camera that you left at home, the quality of the photos taken with cellphones is often less than desirable for use other than sharing on social media.

In this article I will make the case for professional photographic equipment (and a professional using it) – by listing 10 things that are simply not possible with today’s cellphone cameras.

The history of cellphone cameras

But first, let’s take a step back. According to an article in digital trends – the first cell phone with a built-in camera was manufactured by Samsung and released in South Korea in June of 2000. The SCH-V200 flipped open to reveal a 1.5-inch TFT-LCD, and the built-in digital camera was capable of taking 20 photos at 350,000-pixel resolution, which is 0.35-megapixels, but you had to hook it up to a computer to get your photos. The camera and the phone components were essentially separate devices housed in the same body.

Anno 2021, some phone cameras have sensors with specs similar to professional grade DSLR’s and mirror-less cameras – or even more – but megapixels are only part of the story – more on that below.

The pro’s and con’s of cellphone cameras

You can take pretty good pictures with a phone camera, but it is not a replacement for a dedicated camera or studio. There are many pro’s and cons of cellphone cameras vs. professional grade cameras. This article does a pretty good job summarizing it. Cellphone cameras aren’t always bad, but they lack certain characteristics that you need to create professional level portraits of your pets.

What can you control with professional grade equipment ?

While there are always coming more apps on the market to control your phone camera, the level of control you have with a professional grade camera body, optics and lighting is far superior.

Things you can’t achieve with a cellphone: Shutter speed control

1. Show off your pet’s athleticism in running pictures:

Dogs just love to run. It must be so much easier, and so much more fun with four legs. With control over your shutter speed (in the picture below 1/800th of a second) you can freeze the motion and show off the joy of your dog.

running dog

2. Show their craziest faces during playtime:

Get one of their best buddies, a few toys and a yard and you have entertainment for a while. Dogs and cats just love to play. Unfortunately, they do it so fast that we miss most of it !

3. Show their skills catching treats:

Catching treats is fun – for you and your dog. It builds a bond and it helps develop motor skills for your dog. Just don’t overdo it – you don’t want to end up with a fat dog!

Things you can’t achieve with a cellphone: Aperture control

Yes, there is a portrait mode on most cellphones nowadays, which simulates the large apertures and creates a ‘bokeh-like’ blurring effect. But there is more to aperture than that .

4. Use a small aperture to capture all details.

Your pet is awesome. So why not capture some of their awesomeness on photo. By choosing the aperture wisely, in combination with the right lens and lighting, you can capture the smallest detail of their fur, their eyes and other features.